Spotlight image
1 2 3 4 Hide

 

Welcome to the Distributed Cognition and Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory, Department of Cognitive Science, University of California, San Diego. The Dcog-HCI Lab is directed by Professors Jim Hollan and Ed Hutchins

Currently there is a shift in cognitive science toward a view of cognition as a property of systems that are larger than isolated individuals. This extends the reach of cognition to encompass interactions between people as well as interactions with resources in the environment. Members of the Dcog-HCI lab are dedicated to developing the theoretical and methodological foundations engendered by this broader view of cognition and interaction. 

We are united in the belief that distributed cognition promises to be a particularly fertile framework for designing and evaluating augmented environments and digital artifacts. A central image for us is environments in which people pursue their activities in collaboration with the elements of of the social and material world. Our core research efforts are directed at understanding such environments: what we really do in them, how we coordinated our activity in them, and what role technology should play in them.

  • Events
DCog-HCI (see all)

DCog-HCI (Laura Pina)

Laura Pina
Pervasive Health Submission
(click for details)

Wed, Apr 23rd, 2:00pm-3:00pm (SSRB 100)
(4 days, 8 hours from now)


DCog-HCI (Ed Hutchins)

Ed Hutchins, Chris Johnson and Jeremy Karnowski
Dolphin Cognition
(click for details)

Wed, Apr 30th, 2:00pm-3:00pm (SSRB 100)
(1 week, 4 days from now)


Department Events (see all)

CRL talk

Tue, Apr 22nd, 4:00pm-5:00pm (CSB 280)
(3 days, 10 hours from now)


Geof Bowker (Design at Large Seminar)

Geof Bowker
UC Irvine, Informatics
(click for details)

Wed, Apr 23rd, 4:30pm-6:00pm (Marshall Room, Price Center)
(4 days, 10 hours from now)


Rene Vidal (CogSci talk)

Discovering the Language of Surgery

Recent technological advances, such as Robotic Minimally Invasive Surgery, have changed the way in which surgery can be performed, resulting in better precision, smaller incisions and reduced recovery time. However, the steep learning curve together with the lack of fair, objective, and effective criteria for judging the skills acquired by a trainee may reduce the benefits of this technology. In this talk, I will present methods based on sparse dictionary learning, dynamical systems and ...
(click for details)

Fri, Apr 25th, 11:00am-12:00pm (CSB 003)
(6 days, 5 hours from now)